Voice: Miscellaneous

by , last modified on 10/29/17
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This section will go over a variety of lesions that don't fit into the other categories. More videos on the voice can be found on our YouTube playlist on the "Human Voice".

Palate MyoclonusVocal Cord ImmobilityPhlegmy Throat

Click here for audio & video of what normal looks like.
Photos displaying abnormalities can be found in the Photo Library.
Watch a video explaining the 4 Underlying Causes of a Hoarse Voice!

How Were These Images/Videos Obtained??? By a Procedure Called Fiberoptic Trans-Nasal Endoscopy...



Example 1: Palate Myoclonus

This video is looking into the mouth of a patient whose main complaint is a persistent irregularly irregular clicking noise in his ear. This clicking noise is actually due to the involuntary spasming of the soft palate, the muscles of which extend to the eustachian tube which is connected to the ear. Note the involuntary twitching of the palate as well as posterior-lateral throat walls. This twitching is treated with Botox injections.

Example provided courtesy of Dr. James Thomas.

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Example 1 Continued: Palate Myoclonus

This video is looking into the back of the left nose. Note the involuntary twitching of the palate as well as posterior-lateral throat walls. Patient is breathing easily without phonating.

Example provided courtesy of Dr. James Thomas.

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Example 2: Vocal Cord Immobility Evaluation

In this video, the patient had an immobile left vocal cord. It was unclear whether the vocal cord immobility was due to vocal cord paralysis (nerve damage) or due to left arytenoid dislocation (the "joint" of the vocal cord). In order to determine which it was, the patient's voicebox and upper airway was thoroughly anesthetized after which a long curved instrument was used to try and move the left vocal cord back and forth. If it moved freely, the immobility was due to paralysis and if it remained stuck, the immobility would be felt to be due to dislocation.

In this case, the vocal cord moved freely with palpation and the immobility was concluded to be due to vocal cord paralysis.

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Example 3: Phlegmy Throat

In this video, the patient suffered from a severe phlegmy throat after suffering from a stroke. His secretions did not pass down to his stomach, but rather collected in his throat causing constant throat-clearing and coughing up clear phlegm.

As you can see in the video, there is a tremendous amount of mucus pooling present.

Treatment was geared toward improving his swallowing function so that his secretions would not collect in his throat.

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